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To whatever extent it is fair to differentiate between “masculine” and “feminine” ways of being in the world, it is almost always the traditionally feminine (cf – nurture, emotional connection, vulnerability) that is far more capable of embodying the kind of discipleship to which Jesus call us. Moreover, the traditionally masculine (cf – authority in leadership, theological/doctrinal writing, dispassionate detachment) is only capable of reflecting or creating Christ like disciples to the extent that the culture in which those words and forces operate is already deeply shaped by and grounded in the community of love and acceptance made possible by the feminine contribution.

83

I’m confident one of the greatest growing edges of Christian life and practice is learning how to actually love one another. Basic relationship skills take a backseat to pristine statements about things like God, love, sin, or holiness. If the church is to truly be the place where love is found and healing takes place, far more emphasis is needed on understanding how people actually live and relate to one another. If we are to value the contributions of more than those who write down the words, we have to embody the primacy of relationship and community more than the failed project of modern rationality.

80

Inner brain emotion
Outer brain language
Interaction relationship
Society culture

Emotional awareness vivifies fact
Linguistic framing creates worlds
Relational vulnerability breeds trust
Cultural story grounds truth

Experience only in emotion.
Words only in language.
Truth only in relationship.
Narrative only in culture.